Irish renewable energy summit 2018

Significant progress has been made in transforming Ireland’s economy from one dominated by imported fossil fuels to a more indigenous, low carbon economy. Increasing Ireland’s electricity supply from renewable sources, mostly onshore wind, has been the major contributor to this transition. However, there are particular challenges in decarbonising both the transport and heating sectors and it is now looking probable that Ireland will not meet its 2020 targets on RES-H and RES-T. In addition, the European Union’s Clean Energy Package will drive the transition towards low carbon technologies post 2020. This will further increase the drive towards low carbon forms of energy production and there will be a review by the European Commission every two years post 2020 which will keep the focus on the progress of low carbon energy technologies.

A new wave of development

As we approach 2020 and beyond there will be increasing political pressure to ramp up the amount of energy from renewable sources. This is reflected in current policy initiatives. Renewable energy featured as a key element in Gosvernment’s Energy White paper. The outworking of the White Paper will see a new support scheme for renewable energy and a renewable heat incentive scheme (RHI). There will also be a renewed focus on sustainable transport, which will include electric vehicles. Any increase in renewable energy sources will come from a number of areas: wind onshore and offshore; solar; renewable gas; bioenergy; marine; renewable technologies.

Meeting future targets will require collective action and delivery from a range of policy areas. It will require action from across government, public sector agencies and the energy industry. The result will be a second era of renewable energy development that will take Ireland past the 2020 milestone. A lot of the focus will be on renewable heat and transport, but electricity from renewable energy sources will remain central to the transition to a low carbon economy, particularly if transport and heat see significant electrification.

This year’s Irish Renewable Energy Summit comes at a pivotal time in the transition of Ireland’s energy system towards a low carbon future and renewable energy source will be the main driver of that transition.

Speakers include:

Denis Naughten, TD, Minister for Communications, Climate Action and Environment

Denis Naughten, TD, Minister for Communications, Climate Action and Environment

Walt Patterson, Associate Fellow, Chatham House

Walt Patterson, Associate Fellow, Chatham House

Catherine Bowyer, Senior Policy Analyst, Institute for European Environmental Policy

Catherine Bowyer, Senior Policy Analyst, Institute for European Environmental Policy

Ronan Doherty, Chief Executive Officer, ElectroRoute

Ronan Doherty, Chief Executive Officer, ElectroRoute

Jim Gannon, Chief Executive, Sustainable Energy Authority of Ireland

Jim Gannon, Chief Executive, Sustainable Energy Authority of Ireland

Tanya Harrington Head of Government Affairs and Regulation, Powerscourt

Tanya Harrington, Head of Government Affairs and Regulation, Powerscourt

Marek Kubik, Market Director, AES Energy Storage

Marek Kubik, Market Director, AES Energy Storage

Eamonn Confrey Decarbonisation Policy, Department of Communications, Climate Action and Environment

Eamonn Confrey Decarbonisation Policy, Department of Communications, Climate Action and Environment

Brian Ó Gallachóir, Director, Energy Policy and Modelling Research, University College Cork

Brian Ó Gallachóir, Director, Energy Policy and Modelling Research, University College Cork

Neil Walker, Head of Infrastructure, Ibec

Neil Walker, Head of Infrastructure, Ibec

Mark Foley, Managing Director, Coillte

Mark Foley, Managing Director, Coillte

Key themes

Plenary: Renewable energy in Ireland's energy transition

In the opening session of the summit, Irish Energy Minister Denis Naughten will set out his priorities for decarbonising the Irish economy. The session will look at the bigger picture and explore where Ireland is in terms of delivering on its renewable energy ambitions in all areas: electricity, heat and transport. Professor Brian Ó Gallachóir will set the scene for the day’s discussions by detailing where Ireland’s is in terms of actual renewable energy capacity installed and where progress needs to be made. Visiting expert Walt Patterson from Chatham House think tank will give delegates an insight into the geopolitics of renewable energy. There will also be contributions from leaders within the renewable energy sector who deliver the capacity on the ground. This will include speakers from both the onshore and offshore wind sectors and speakers on the renewable heat and transport sectors.

Session: Solar energy

After wind, solar offers the most potential in terms of MW delivered in a short time horizon. Other European countries on a similar latitude as Ireland, such as Germany and Austria, now have significant amounts of installed solar capacity. A representative from the Irish Solar Association will detail the barriers to developing solar energy in Ireland and what needs to be done. There will also be speakers from solar developers on the practicalities of developing solar energy in Ireland.

Session: Bioenergy

Bioenergy is an often-neglected aspect of Irish energy policy and offers much potential in the heating and transport sectors. Biomass offers particular solutions for using renewable sources in heating. To date biofuels have been the main source of renewable energy in transport. The session plans to look at the potential of a Renewable Heat Incentive (RHI) scheme the Government is currently consulting on.

This is why you need to be at the Irish Renewable Energy Summit 2018

Who you can expect to meet:

The summit will be of interest to senior managers and decisionmakers in the renewable energy sector. Delegates come from right across the renewable energy sector and the wider energy sector with a contingent from overseas. Delegates will include:

  • Chief Executives, directors and senior managers in the energy sector
  • Policy makers and regulators
  • Engineering and technical consultants
  • Legal and financial advisors
  • Planning and environmental professionals
  • Equipment suppliers

Key themes covered:

  • Continued role for onshore wind;
  • Developing offshore wind;
  • Future role of solar energy;
  • Electrification of Ireland’s transport fleet;
  • Supporting R&D in wave and tidal technologies;
  • The growing importance of bioenergy;
  • A new renewable heat incentive.

Benefits of attending:

  • Discuss the role of renewables in the energy transition
  • Hear directly from developers of renewable energy
  • Learn about innovative projects being implemented
  • Network with other professionals across the renewable energy sector

Networking

The summit is structured in such a way to provide a high level of interaction between speakers and delegates. There will be plentiful opportunities for questions as well as discussion in each of the sessions. In the margins of the event there will also be ample scope for business development during the busy networking breaks which take place in our exhibition area.

Exhibition opportunities:


There are a limited number of opportunities to become involved with this conference as an exhibitor. This is an excellent way for organisations to showcase their expertise and raise their profile with a key audience of senior decision makers from across Ireland’s renewable energy sector. This interactive, multi-stream conference provides an excellent opportunity for making contacts and networking. For further information on how your organisation can benefit, contact Sam Torney on +353 (0)1 661 3755 or email sam.torney@energyireland.ie

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